Glyphosate: links in a lot of nasty chains

Once glyphosate is gone from the agricultural landscape (as it must) it is unlikely to be replaced, and a lot of deep changes will have to happen - hopefully for the better.

After 30 years of systematically attempting to dominate the world’s food supply through deceit and tyranny Monsanto, in late 2018, scurried under the skirts of Bayer Crop Science Division. Though it may no longer exist legally its 4000+ lawsuits against RoundUp still do. Although court judgements against Monsanto were once unheard of the August/18 verdict of $78M damages seems to be a signal that that’s about to change.

Monsanto has always been a heavyweight in the game of nasty chemicals, as Bayer still is. It discovered and patented the compound glyphosate, a chemical which causes metabolic disruption in plants, killing them essentially through systemic malnutrition. Because the same metabolic pathway isn’t present in animals glyphosate was eventually cleared by the US EPA to be marketed as a herbicide. Monsanto’s brand-name is Roundup but these days it is sold under licence under various names.

Later, when Monsanto’s gene-scientists learned how to impart glyphosate resistance into plant DNA the RoundUp Ready story was born. The glyphosate-GMO combo went to market in 1996 as a whole new way to further intensify intensive farming. It allowed for bigger acreages with less work and bigger crops: it changed the face of big-scale farming but not for the better. Farmers loved it and Monsanto made dizzying profits. But within a few years cracks began to appear; super-weeds, nutrition, kidney dysfunction ... cancer! Deceit, fake science, intimidation and corruption were used to hide these unwanted side-effects. These issues are set out in an early documentary, see ...The World According to Monsanto (2007).

Those early concerns described in that documentary have since then only magnified, with mounting alarm about the long-term health and environmental issues. ... GLYPHOSATE is presently in the process of being banned in country after country. ... More significantly the GMOs associated with it must also go. At last, it looks like an end for this harmful product is in sight, but ... its unhealthy legacy will likely persist for generations to come, and in some aspect the damage done to the earth's genosphere has been done forever. Part of the legacy that remains with us is a GMO industry that is bent on justifying its own unnecessary existence, by any means possible. At least while there remains that alluring possibility of controlling the world's major seed supplies . (see ... Food Evolution, 2017).

Where to Now From Here

We could look back at the world before Monsanto and try to imagine it now as if their products had never occurred. But industrial-style farming was never sustainable: it always was a major cause of atmospheric change, of massive fertility deficits, of serious biodiversity losses. So instead, we should look back even further, to a time before WWI and WWII decimated rural populations, in order for a real glimpse at sustainable farming and the way food needs to be grown for optimal health.

Those chemical-based technologies that replaced manpower shortages have colonised the farming industry, displacing the accumulated wisdom of traditional land-use experience. But that was only for European cultures. In other parts of the world, amongst traditional peasant cultures, much of land-use wisdom has persisted though under severe threat from enterprise agriculture.

The agrichemical industry is never going to accept that its chemical/GMO tricks against Nature always wear off - evolution always wins. Roundup has lost on the medical front, and has been losing on the farming front for a while, to more toxic (and expensive) 'solutions'. There is a host of them, all headed for a similar failure. The only long-term sustainable solution is in the re-peasantisation of farming, a re-populating of the rural landscape with smaller family farms. That seems a long way off, just for now.

The biotech industry's bid for global domination of the world’s food supply is faltering and a down scaling of farming is inevitable, if not imminent. Already farmers across America are facing a mortgage crisis. Industrial farming sows the seed of its own destruction, with potentially a food system collapse, and massive social and economic disruption.


New Evidence that Glyphosate is a Probable Carcinogen:

Recommended reading...

5G Wireless Towers

Health Concerns Regarding 5G Small Cell Tower Installations

On May 29, 2018, CBS News aired a segment about the many Americans who are fighting small cell towers being installed in residential yards and everywhere else in their communities.

The wireless industry is in a race to roll out 5G service. The network is supposed to be up to 100 times faster than current data speeds, but it requires cellphone tower equipment to be closer to users than before.

Wireless companies in the U.S. say they will have to install about 300,000 new antennas – roughly equal to the total number of cell towers built over the past three decades. That’s causing outrage and alarm in some neighborhoods, as antennas go up around homes.

Decades of research – including research on millimeter waves like 5G – says there are plenty of reasons to worry about harm from exposure to all sources of cell phone and wireless WiFi radiation.

Countless doctorsenvironmental organisationsscientists, concerned citizens, and some elected officials have been fighting the installation of small cell towers in their communities because of health concerns and more.

Various other media outlets have also been reporting about this including The NationDemocracy NowNPRNewsweek, and Dr. Oz.  The Telecom Industry is being referred to as Big Wireless and compared to “Big Tobacco.”

Many U.S. broadcast news stations have also been reporting concerns about radiation exposure from these towers and other sources of new technology as well.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is the government agency that regulates new technology.  They are part of “The Swamp” that President Trump promised to drain.

The former FCC chairman (appointed by President Obama) started working again for the Telecom Industry immediately after leaving The FCC.  Current FCC Chairman, Ajit Pai has referred to American efforts to stop tower installation in their communities as “NIMBYism run amok” (Not in My Back Yard).  Last week FCC Commissioner, Michael O’Rielly, referred to those who are fighting as “bad actors”and stated the FCC is done with “being nice.”

Tech and security experts have labelled “The Race for 5G” as a bail-out” of the Telecom Industry.

Forcing communities to accept these small cell towers when they don’t want them goes against everything this country stands for – and what President Trump promised.  For those who want to use 5G, Samsung will be selling 5G home routers very soon so we don’t need no stinking small cell towers.

When you don’t say “no” to small cell towers in your neighbourhood, you say “yes” to small cell towers in your neighborhood.

Roundup Whitewash

Monsanto Now Wants to Defund the WHO

Monsanto anticipated that the World Health Organization scientists would find glyphosate to be a probable human carcinogen.

They knew that this would happen and have been preparing to discredit them since March of 2015.

The UN for decades has been telling us what will cause cancer and what won’t cause cancer. In 2016 they came out and they say, “Roundup is a probable cause of cancer.” So rather than Monsanto saying, “Well, maybe we ought to warn people about that” instead they’re now trying to de-fund the World Health Organization because it said something that’s going to hurt their profits.

Apparently Monsanto have some friendly Republicans in Washington D.C. to push the message. They’re looking trying to de-fund IARC. A hearing was scheduled for 06/02/18 to take a look at some of these matters. It’s a really powerful move by a powerful company to try to take on these international cancer scientists.

In February 2018 Monsanto hit Avaaz, the international petition site, with a 168-page court subpoena about a petition they had just launched.


An interview with Carey Gillam, author of – Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science

The senior village movement: US

The ‘Village to Village Network’ helps communities establish and manage their own aging in place initiatives called Villages.

In 2010, the Village to Village Network – a U.S-based organisation that collaborates to maximize the growth, impact and sustainability of individual Villages and the Village Movement – was formed. The Network provides expert guidance, resources and support to help communities establish and maintain their Villages.

Learn about Village to Village

For those interested in joining a village, what’s the best way? What’s the first step?
The best way is to check our website where there’s an interactive village map with multiple search options to search by city or state. There’s additional contact information if people want to get in touch directly, or they can also reach out to use and we’ll connect them to the local village.
If someone wants to start a Village, what are the first few steps?
Get on the website and explore the villages to learn more about the model. See what resources are available, connect with a village that might be somewhat close to your area, [and] see what other interest there is in your area. Are there other individuals interested in doing this? Are there existing nonprofits or organizations you can partner with? Is the local government interested? Start to gauge that interest.
This is not a one-person job so the more support you can get up-front, the better. Start thinking through what your village might look like. What’s already available in your community? What’s lacking?
Early partnerships are really important. Even if they’re not directly involved with starting the village, just plant a bug in their ear and see what kind of resources they could help provide. In return, see if there’s something the village can give back to them.
What makes a successful senior village? What are some tips to help it thrive?
They key is building up that strong sense of community. That’s what really sells people on the concept and idea. Some communities still do that well, but I think we’re starting to lose that. Whether people move or just get busy, that can be harder to come by. I talked to a couple villages recently that don’t have as strong a sense of community as they would like. They’re trying to build it up by letting their members know that they have a community and a network of support, not just a ride to the doctor, but someone to talk to or lend a helping hand.
Aging in place is a really great concept, but it can be isolating. If you don’t have children or other family living near you having someone to check in on you, or bring your groceries once a week, or make sure you’re getting out of the house and participating in things, can be an important piece of this.
Are there other challenges senior villages face? If so, how are they being addressed?
Broader sustainability of the village model is the biggest challenge, especially revenue and revenue diversification. Villages are really trying to keep their membership affordable. Membership only covers 40-60 percent of their revenue so they have to figure out how to fill in the gaps.
Being more for-profit business minded when it comes to building partnerships and bringing in different revenue streams is really important. We’re looking at, and focusing more on, what some of those other models for nonprofits or associations are. We can help educate our villages about resources we can provide and partnerships we can provide that might trickle down to them and bring more sustainability to the movement as a whole.
What other tips can you offer for those interested in joining the senior village movement? 
Even if you’re just exploring the idea of a senior village, we have an introductory membership that’s $100 for six months. It gives 10 people in your community access to all our resources, including the Village 101 Toolkit and our discussion forum, to see what’s there and what this is all about. You can start exploring in your community and see what might be needed.

Election campaign – help stop National’s healthcare cuts this election

ActionStation (NZ) has started an election campaign to save our public healthcare system from National’s  plan to slash funding for public health, putting good health and peace of mind out of reach for hundreds of thousands of people.

Each cut the Government makes to our health budget represents a person who might not receive a hip operation, cancer screening, counseling service, or a hospital bed that can’t be funded.

The worst part? The Government could afford to fund healthcare properly. They choose not to. [1] Some speculate that this is how the National Government plan to pay for vote-bribing tax cuts next (Election) year. [2] We’re looking for people around New Zealand to help us pull it off.

Here’s what they’re going to do:

We’re going to build a community-led movement so powerful that whoever wants to win our vote in 2017 has to commit to at least $200 million in additional funding in our annual Health Budget. Two hundred million is the minimum amount we need to bring health care funding in line with inflation, population growth and an ageing population. It is a massive ask, and will take a serious re-prioritising in Government spending, but we believe if our movement can build grassroots popular community support for this, we can make health funding one of the key Election issues in 2017.

But we have to start now:

We’ve set up 20 local campaigns – one for each DHB in New Zealand – in the different regions. All 20 campaigns have petitions focused on pressuring local MPs to step up to invest in our health system. Five of these campaigns already have teams of people or individuals committed to making sure they gather community support. We’re now looking for people to step up and get to work for our public health system in the following areas:

  • Waitemata
  • Counties Manukau
  • Bay of Plenty
  • Gisborne
  • South Canterbury
  • West Coast
  • Wairarapa
  • Hutt
  • Waikato
  • Nelson-Marlborough
  • Rotorua
  • Whanganui
  • Otago
  • Taranaki
  • Canterbury

Ready to help save our public health system from under-funding?

Here’s what’s involved:
  • Second – if the fit is good, we’ll sign you up as a local leader of the campaign, send you a handy guide and give you a call to ensure you have all the information you need to start collecting signatures in your community. We’ll provide online and over the phone training in the key tactics for winning campaigns, like writing emails that inspire people to join your campaign, and getting media coverage for your effort.

  • Finally – we’ll support you to organise a petition delivery to your local MP – and help you get media coverage too.

This combination of community-led campaigning and widespread media coverage will ensure that health is a key election issue in 2017.

In order for this to work, we need ActionStation members in every corner of the country signing up to drive local campaign action. We’re looking for both leaders and people who can be part of a team, who will work with ActionStation staff to collect signatures online and in the community, and organise a petition delivery to your local MP. The best part? You’ll be supported every step of the way.

You don’t need expert skills to apply, just commitment to the cause, determination, and at least one hour a week to give to this. Apply here to help lead your local campaign today for health care … ActionStation campaigners will be just one email away.

This is a long-term strategy, and we can’t pull it off without your help, but I reckon together we can help lay the foundations for a strong and secure future where all New Zealanders can receive the quality healthcare they need.

PS. If you don’t want to be a petition leader, you can still find and sign your local petition by clicking here. Simply type in your address or region to be directed to your nearest campaign!

References:

  1.  ‘Funding New Zealand’s public healthcare system: time for an honest appraisal and public debate’, New Zealand Medical Journal (pay-walled)
  2. John Key hints he’ll fight election $3 billion package tax cuts (NZ Herald, 16 May 2016).

Another Big-Screen Movie Just Released Investigates Vaccines For Autism Implications

Hot on the heels of the CDC-whistleblower and vaccine-fraud-documentary VAXXED, a new feature length film – Man Made Epidemic – made its debut in London (UK) at the Curzon Cinema in Soho on Thursday, June 16, 2016!

Congratulations and thanks to filmmaker Natalie Beers, and other production crew members for taking on such an overwhelming project, and for having the fortitude to work on a much-needed investigation of vaccines, vaccinations and environmental issues relative to ever-increasing autism rates, particularly in the USA.

Man Made Epidemic” was earlier this month pulled from London’s East End Festival. That festival director decided to withdraw when another documentary VAXXED, which also dealt with vaccine safety, had earlier bowed to outside pressure and was pulled  from the Tribeca Film Festival.

Earlier, the movie VAXXED, which documents that embarrassing, conniving and fraudulent vaccine science story about how the US Centre for Disease Control (CDC) attempted to destroy compelling evidence that the MMR vaccine caused autism in young black boys – only weeks before had failed to make its debut screening at the Film Festival due to intense industry pressure.


When you see (below) Dr Hilleman’s* nonchalant disclosure from the film, plus how cavalierly colleagues treated the information, you will realise why you really have to question vaccine ingredients …

* Dr Maurice Hilleman, MD, the head vaccine maker at Merck & Company for years.

Read: Why Doctors Don’t Vaccinate Their Children

President Putin Calls Westerners ‘Intensively Vaccinated Borderline Autistic Fat Man …’

Russian President, Vladimir Putin is making waves again today and this time, it is because he is once again, slamming the pharmaceutical alliances and big food corporations. He believes that both of these entities are divisive, mind-controlling and poisonous beings with the ambition of world population control.

In a report prepared by the Security Council (SCRF), President Putin has put these entities on notice and stated that his people should be protected from pharmaceutical companies and GMO foods “at all costs.” According to YourNewsWire Putin also stated that human evolution is at “grave risk” and that Western powers are “intentionally decelerating the process for personal gain.”

We as a species have the choice to continue to develop our bodies and brains in a healthy upward trajectory, or we can follow the Western example of recent decades and intentionally poison our population with genetically altered food, pharmaceuticals, vaccinations, and fast food that should be classified as a dangerous, addictive drug.”
“We must fight this.  A physically and intellectually disabled population is not in our interests,” the report states. It also states Putin describing Western culture as, “intensively vaccinated borderline autistic fat man slumped in front of a screen battling a high-fructose corn syrup comedown.”

Russia has always been anti-GMO, promoting the rise of farmers who do so under non-GMO circumstance. All this being fair and equal, Putin has also announced that Russia has invented an Ebola vaccine.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has claimed that his country has developed a vaccine for the Ebola virus which has killed thousands of people in west Africa.

But Putin, who is famed for his talent for headline-grabbing announcements, did not divulge the vaccine’s name, nor did he say how it worked, who was developing it or give details of any trials.

“We have good news,” Putin was quoted as saying by RIA Novosti news agency.
We have registered a drug against Ebola, which after the corresponding tests has been shown to be highly effective, more effective than the drugs used worldwide up to now.”

Maybe he’s headline-grabbing on this issue? Either way, it is difficult to invalidate his prior statements regard the West’s relationship with pharmaceutical companies. While his proclamation may be rather rough around the edges, it is nonetheless accurate. The rate of autism in U.S. children is now at 1-45 with no viable solution or investigations into solutions in play. The future would seem dismal on this front. Childhood obesity is now at over 50% and growing. At some point the West most certainly needs to wake up and see that the powers that be aren’t working in our favour.

Source:  |  truthkings.com

First in Organics – now in Medical Training

Globally, the need for doctors is urgent. There is currently a deficit of seven million doctors, nurses, and other health care workers in developing countries — and that number is expected to nearly double in the next 20 years. The WHO warns that the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), like reducing maternal and infant mortality, will not happen without more health care workers.

Even with all of the new funding for global health these days, professional training remains one of the most critically underserved needs. Passing out emergency supplies is one thing; the multi-year intensive schooling needed to train physicians requires a whole different level of commitment.

Foreign aid is notoriously faddish: a few years ago the “teach a man to fish” parable was omnipresent. But as often happens, the rhetoric did not equal reality. Most foreign aid today is aimed at achieving a particular outcome, such as fighting a disease, providing emergency food, or alleviating the effects of a natural disaster or crisis.

The Cuban model takes a fundamentally different approach: it teaches people essential skills, so that they can be responsible for their own outcomes.

Samantha Marie Moore, a sixth-year ELAM student from Detroit, Michigan, examines Estrella Gomez Mesa, 76, during morning rounds at the Salvador Allende Hospital in Havana, Cuba.

ELAM opened in 1999 in the wake of Hurricane Mitch, which devastated the Caribbean and Central America. The idea was to help replace doctors that had been lost among Cuba’s neighbors. Since then, the school has trained more than 26,000 doctors from 124 countries around the world.

In one small lab class, two dozen students were drawn from Chad, Sierra Leone, Angola, South Africa, Congo, Belize, and U.S. The school provides six years of medical education, as compared to four in U.S. medical schools. The extra years are spent learning about public health, tropical medicine, and Cuba’s unique focus on prevention. Doctors learn to make diagnoses by knowing about their patients’ working and living conditions, and by interacting, touching, and listening.

Students from the U.S. started attending ELAM in 2005, after members of the Congressional Black Caucus met with Fidel Castro and heard about the training program. Representative Bennie Thompson told the Cuban leader that his constituents did not have access to decent medical care. Castro immediately offered 500 spots to American students. (To date, 134 U.S. students have graduated, and more than 50 are now in residency programs.)

There are no laptops in an ELAM lecture hall. Unlike U.S. medical schools, where most training takes place in the classroom, Cuban medical students spend a lot of time treating patients and performing procedures like inserting a catheter, setting broken bones, or delivering a baby.

Source: | The Development Set

Hope’s Edge

Diet for a Small Planet was a 1971 bestseller. It was the first major book to note the environmental impact of meat production as wasteful and a contributor to global food scarcity.

Celebrating the fortieth anniversary of this book, author Frances Moore Lappé stresses how her philosophy remains valid today, and that food remains the central issue through which to understand world politics.

“More than any other this book that taught America the social and personal significance of a new way of eating– one that remains a complete guide for eating well, forty years on. Featuring: simple rules for a healthy diet; a streamlined, easy-to-use format; delicious food combinations of protein-rich meals without meat; hundreds of wonderful recipes, and much more.”

Ten years ago Frances, with daughter Anna, published, Hope’s Edge: The Next Diet for a Small Planet (2006)

Tying today’s many different food movements together

“If I could somehow orchestrate it all, I would want us to have more of a common theme song, and that theme song has the word “democracy” in it. That we are redefining democracy through activism around food, the most basic of all our needs, linking our diets to the earth and to each other, whether it’s school gardens or anti-GMOs [genetically modified organisms]. I would love to see us always tying it back into what we share, the concept of what I call living democracy.

“I would love to have more of a canopy of hope over all of our work, the hope that we are agents of a deeper practice of democracy that will reclaim our rightful roles as citizens, despite the dominance now of private entities over the public. That’s the tension I live with all the time, between celebration and yearning for that seed, a real voice for regular people.

A recognition of human dignity

“The struggle is not just that everyone has enough nutrients, the struggle is ultimately about whether we all recognize each other as people worthy of a voice, and therefore people with dignity, who are not just recipients, but co-creators. That’s what could unite us: recognizing that this is not just about supply, but about extreme imbalances in our power relationships. We’ve created structures which give such huge numbers of people in the world so little capacity to act in their own interests, and in the common interest.

Links between the food movements and the sharing movements, the commons?

“In Germany, they have sharing centres where if people have too many leftovers, they can just drop off the food. Some of them have significant refrigerators, and anybody can drop off food and anyone can pick it up. Everybody is responsible for themselves. Food waste is such a totally avoidable outrage, and that idea that, of course, we don’t just throw away good food, and making it easy for people to feel good about sharing with others.

Now there are 28 countries in whose Constitution, food is an explicit human right. I think of the city that Anna* and I visited for Hope’s Edge, Belo Horizonte in Brazil, the idea of food as a public good. As the leaders there explained it to us, what has really changed is social mentality, from food as a private good to food as a public good, like education. You realise that an educated people is a benefit to everyone: if your community is educated, of course, everyone benefits.

* Daughter Anna Lappé, also a respected author and educator, is known for her work as an expert on food systems and as a sustainable food advocate.

Democracy’s Edge (2006) [pdf], Frances Moore Lappé

Hope’s Edge: The Next Diet for a Small Planet [ePub], Frances Moore Lappé.(2003)

Genetically engineered apples get the nod from US FDA

All ready for 2016-2017

In March 2015, two varieties of genetically-engineered apples and six types of genetically-altered potatoes claim to offer just as much nutrition and as little safety risk as their conventional relatives, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ruled.

The Arctic Granny Apple

The agency officials announced that the “Arctic Apples” by Okanagan Specialty Fruits and the “Innate” potatoes from J. R. Simplot Company passed the voluntary safety tests on Friday after the two products picked up approvals from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What’s next?

Cancer-fighting pink pineapples from Del Monte, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils from Monsanto?

Such GE foods could receive U.S. government approval in the coming years. The companies and scientists which have created these foods hope that customers will be attracted to the health benefits and convenience and overlook any concerns about genetic engineering.

Questionable Developments

At least they have started to consider what’s in it for the eater-consumer. But the big question which arises is; if better health can already be gained by ordinary and obviously cheaper means then these products are marginal at best. So why should consumers trust this direction, especially with companies with a track record like Monsanto ?

 

Source: | New York Daily News

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